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Is there an association between metabolic syndrome and tooth loss?

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This is a summary of the article: "Association between metabolic syndrome and tooth loss. A systematic review and meta-analysis" in the December 2019 edition of the Journal of the American Dental Association.

The authors conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to verify the existence and level of scientific evidence concerning the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS), as the main exposure, and tooth loss (TL), as the outcome.

Metabolic syndrome is defined as a cluster of conditions that increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.

Metabolic syndrome is defined as a cluster of conditions that increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Among the components that characterize MetS are raised blood pressure, dyslipidemia (raised triglyceride and lowered high density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol levels), raised fasting glucose levels, and central obesity.

Patients must have at least 3 of these abnormal findings to have a diagnosis of MetS. These factors separately contribute to the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes, but when they occur at the same time, the risk becomes greater.

Tooth loss can be related to a poor general health status, worsened quality of life, and increased stress and depressive symptoms.

Tooth loss is considered one of the worst oral health outcomes and can be related to a poor general health status, worsened quality of life, and increased stress and depressive symptoms. In addition, it may make chewing difficult and have an effect on eating patterns. The cumulative exposure to periodontal disease (PD) and caries is the main reason for TL in adults.

Clinical Implications

  1. Participants with MetS had, on average, fewer teeth and a greater chance of lacking functional dentition than did those with no MetS.
  2. The findings of this systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that MetS is associated positively with TL.
  3. However, because of the very low level of evidence, clinicians should use caution when considering these findings.
  4. Better-conducted longitudinal studies with use of appropriate causal modeling approaches are necessary to establish a causal relationship between MetS and TL.

I hope you you find the  information helpful. We always look forward to hearing your thoughts and receiving your questions and/or suggestions about this post and other topics. Leave a comment in the box below or send us your feedback by email.

Until next time!
Chiraz Guessaier, CDA Oasis Manager

References

Bibliography: Association between metabolic syndrome and tooth loss. A systematic review and meta-analysis (PDF)

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