Home » News & Events » News Bites from CDA Knowledge Networks – 2018/07/11

News Bites from CDA Knowledge Networks – 2018/07/11

Top 5 Must Read

  1. Current Consultations: Standard of Practice on Infection Prevention and Control; Guideline – Diagnosis and Management of TMD; and Standard of Practice on Sedation and General Anesthesia. rcdso.org: At its June 14, 2018 meeting, Council approved in principle a new Standard of Practice on Infection Prevention and Control; Guideline – Diagnosis and Management of TMD; and Standard of Practice on Sedation and General Anesthesia. As part of its consultation process, RCDSO invites feedback on the Standards from all stakeholders, including Ontario dentists and the public. Read more
  2. The effectiveness of chlorhexidine is limited in preventing infections in oral procedures. com: The results point to the relative and not particularly significant effectiveness of the use of chlorhexidine when it comes to preventing the bacteria present in the mouth from passing into the bloodstream when dental extraction is carried out. Read more
  3. Several drugs containing valsartan being recalled due to contamination with a potential carcinogen. gc.ca: Drugs containing valsartan are used to treat patients with high blood pressure to help prevent heart attacks and stroke. These drugs are also used in patients who have had heart failure or a recent heart attack. Read more
  4. How will marijuana legalization affect your workplace? financialpost.com: Employers should update their company policies, and provide training on workplace policy, to make sure workers clearly understand what they can and cannot do. Read more
  5. Purdue Pharma halts marketing of opioids in Canada. com: The pharmaceutical giant whose pain pill triggered an overdose epidemic that has devastated communities across North America has stopped marketing its opioids in Canada. Read more

Canadian dentistry news

Quebec dentists threaten withdrawal from public plan, target Barrette. montreal.ctvnews.ca: Angered over what they call a lack of enthusiasm from Quebec Health Minister Gaetan Barrette over a new collective agreement, Quebec’s dentists are threatening to withdraw from a public dental plan. Read more

Les dentistes menacent de se retirer du régime public. lapresse.ca : Les dentistes du Québec lancent un ultimatum à Gaétan Barrette. Si une nouvelle entente n’est pas signée avant le 26 juillet prochain entre le ministre de la Santé et leur association, ils quitteront en bloc le régime public de soins dentaires. Lire plus

Current Consultations: Standard of Practice on Infection Prevention and Control; Guideline – Diagnosis and Management of TMD; and Standard of Practice on Sedation and General Anesthesia. org: At its June 14, 2018 meeting, Council approved in principle a new Standard of Practice on Infection Prevention and Control; Guideline – Diagnosis and Management of TMD; and Standard of Practice on Sedation and General Anesthesia. As part of its consultation process, RCDSO invites feedback on the Standards from all stakeholders, including Ontario dentists and the public. Read more

Un prix reconnaissance partenaire santé pour la Faculté! fmd.ulaval.ca : Olympique spéciaux Québec a honoré la Faculté en juin dernier, en lui remettant le prix Golisano Award. Celui-ci reconnaît l’engagement de la Faculté pour l’amélioration de l’accessibilité à la santé buccodentaire auprès des personnes qui vivent avec un handicap intellectuel. Lire plus

Recognizing Retiring Faculty. schulich.uwo.ca: Schulich Dentistry recognized the retirements of three much valued faculty members, Dr. Jeffrey Dixon, Dr. Cornelis Driessen, and Dr. Sahza Hatibovic-Kofman, Professor Emeritus. Read more

When disability insurance payouts are not actually tax-free. business.financialpost.com: The case involved a Sherbrooke dental surgeon who was reassessed by the taxman for her 2009, 2010 and 2011 taxation years. Read more

CDAA Weekly E-Newsbrief July 11, 2018. cdaa.ca: Read more

International dentistry news

Urgent need for sugary drinks tax: New Zealand health boards. nzherald.co.nz: DHBs want a tax on sugary drinks – warning the obesity epidemic could result in Kiwi kids living shorter lives than their parents. Read more

Banned from Soap, Is Triclosan in Your Toothpaste? webmd.com: Triclosan, an antibacterial and antimicrobial chemical, has been used in personal care products and as a pesticide for decades. Scientists in recent years have stepped up their research into its potential health risks. Read more

British Dental Association Northern Ireland champions oral health of older adults. fdiworlddental.org: BDA Northern Ireland calls for increased investment in community and general dental services, so practitioners can offer a comprehensive and tailored approach to oral healthcare within the elderly community. Read more

Sugar, tobacco and alcohol taxes are being underused, say leading international experts. fdiworlddental.org: In a recently published commentary article in The Lancet, an international group of experts are calling for governments to adopt sugar, tobacco and alcohol taxes (STAX) to improve global health outcomes. Read more

Children eat five times more sugar during summer holidays, study finds. independent.co.uk: Ice cream and sugary drinks are the biggest culprits, with just one in 10 parents reporting their child eats more vegetables over school break. Read more

Tobacco cessation goal of CDC Tips campaign, webinar. ada.org: This year, the Tips From Former Smokers campaign includes the story of an oral cancer survivor, Christine, a Pennsylvania woman who was diagnosed with oral cancer at age 44 and had to get half of her jaw removed as part of treatment. Read more

What the New Tax Deduction for Pass-Through Business Income Means for General Dentists. adg.org: With the enactment of Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, dentists who meet certain income-based criteria can qualify for lower tax rates. Read more

Sugary drinks advertised on Facebook putting young people at risk. nzherald.co.nz: New Zealand’s Dental Association are calling for tighter regulation on advertising sugary drinks on Facebook. They say young people are being targeted by the adverts, causing challenges for those in public health advocacy and policy to reduce obesity. Read more

Drop-in dental cafe opens in the north west. dentistry.co.uk: ‘The idea of The Dental Cafe came to light after noticing a growing trend for walk-in dental hygiene and cosmetic boutiques in London. Read more

10 things I wish I knew before my dental mission trip. asdablog.com: Read more

Clinical & scientific news

Heal or harm, switching macrophages on or off. dentistry.ubc.ca: A multi-disciplinary team led by Dr. Chris Overall are a step closer to turning off the lights on oral health inflammation as well as understanding the mechanisms behind autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Read more

The effectiveness of chlorhexidine is limited in preventing infections in oral procedures. com: The results point to the relative and not particularly significant effectiveness of the use of chlorhexidine when it comes to preventing the bacteria present in the mouth from passing into the bloodstream when dental extraction is carried out. Read more

Differences in the mouths of youth born with HIV may increase their risk of dental decay. medicalxpress.com: A team of scientists from The Forsyth Institute has published the results of a new study indicating that differences in the mouth bacteria of youth born with HIV may increase their risk of cavities. Read more

New form of wound healing revealed by parasitic gut worms. medicalxpress.com: Experiments using parasitic worms in the mouse gut have revealed a surprising new form of wound repair, a finding that could help scientists develop ways to enhance the body’s natural healing abilities. Read more

We need to have better conversations about DIY dentistry. dentistryiq.com: We are witnessing the rise of companies that allow customers to perform irreversible dental procedures on themselves. While at-home whitening solutions have been around for roughly two decades without too much controversy, at-home orthodontics has generated significantly more concern. Read more

Dental Pain and Opioid Use Latest Findings. pewtrusts.org: Statistics show dentists have written a declining portion of all opioid prescriptions in recent years, but two new studies highlight the continued need for cautious prescribing. Read more

Mind your business

Dentists are Struggling to Keep Up with Patient Expectations. oralhealthgroup.com: As technology changes and becomes a bigger part of our everyday lives, you must prepare for your patients’ expectations of a dental office to be tech-heavy. Read more

How will marijuana legalization affect your workplace? Business.financialpost.com: Employers should update their company policies, and provide training on workplace policy, to make sure workers clearly understand what they can and cannot do. Read more

Patient information

What Can Adults Do to Maintain Good Oral Health? cdc.gov: Read more

Your health & medical news

Employers turn to online therapy programs to boost worker productivity. theglobeandmail.com: The clients Lindsay Killam sees as an alcohol-abuse counsellor are often professionals: people who don’t have a lot of free time and typically don’t want to broadcast that they’re in treatment. That’s why they meet with her online. Read more

Is my fungus going viral? theglobeandmail.com: Sharing health data can be both good and bad. What makes the difference is when patients have control over their information. See attached or Read more

Is one of these common problems causing stress in your dental practice? dentistryiq.com: There are ways to keep stress under control, starting with recognizing the cause. With a few changes, you can alleviate common stressors, putting your practice back on the path toward success and profitability. Read more

Doctors top list of worst drivers for fifth straight year. cmajnews.com: Stress and fatigue have been cited as reasons for high rates of traffic collisions among health care professionals. Read more

Decisions by new Ontario government worry science and health care communities. cmajnews.com: Changes to the province’s youth pharmacare program were among the new Ontario government’s first major decisions. Read more

Low-quality healthcare is increasing the burden of illness and health costs globally. who.int: Poor quality health services are holding back progress on improving health in countries at all income levels. Read more

Several drugs containing valsartan being recalled due to contamination with a potential carcinogen. gc.ca: Drugs containing valsartan are used to treat patients with high blood pressure to help prevent heart attacks and stroke. These drugs are also used in patients who have had heart failure or a recent heart attack. Read more

Tele-pharmacists improving med reconciliation in LTC. canhealth.com: The peopleCare Inc. group of nursing homes and retirement communities is putting medication reconciliation back into the hands of the expert – the pharmacist. Read more

Stopping type 1 diabetes from birth. bbc.com: Experts believe they may have found a way to prevent high risk babies from developing type 1 diabetes. Read more

FDA updates warnings for fluoroquinolone antibiotics on risks of mental health and low blood sugar adverse reactions. fda.gov: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is requiring safety labeling changes for a class of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones to strengthen the warnings about the risks of mental health side effects and serious blood sugar disturbances, and make these warnings more consistent across the labeling for all fluoroquinolones taken by mouth or given by injection. Read more

What Does a Drug Cost? It Depends on Where You Live. nytimes.com: A new analysis finds the price of certain drugs varies widely depending on what city they are sold in. Read more

Opioid prescription rate up in N.L., down in every other Canadian province. cbc.ca: Newfoundland and Labrador was the only province in the country to see an increase in the rate of opioid prescriptions last year. Read more

Purdue Pharma halts marketing of opioids in Canada. theglobeandmail.com: The pharmaceutical giant whose pain pill triggered an overdose epidemic that has devastated communities across North America has stopped marketing its opioids in Canada. Read more

 

Continuing education matters

Dalhousie University – Current course offerings

McGill University – Winter 2017 continuing education – upcoming courses

Université Laval – Formation continue

University of Manitoba – Continuing professional development

Université de Montréal – Formation dentaire continue

University of Alberta – Program and courses

University of British Columbia – Calendar of courses

University of Saskatchewan – Continuing professional dental education

University of Toronto – Continuing dental education

Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry University – Continuing professional development

August 22-25 – CDA Convention, hosted by the Dental Association of PEI. Read more

August 31-September 2 – 24th International Association for Disability and Oral Health Congress, in Dubai, UAE. Registration now open

September 5-8, – FDI World Dental Congress, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Read more

September 6-8 – 2017 Saskatchewan Oral Health Conference, in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Read mores

September 6-8 – California Dental Association Presents The Art and Science of Dentistry, in San Francisco, California. Read more

September 13-15 – Dentsply Sirona World 2018, in Orlando, Florida. Read more

September 20-22: Orthodontic World Congress Europe 2018, in Malta. Read more

September 21 – Northwest Dental Exposition 2018, Edmonton, Alberta. Read more

September 27-29: 26th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Canadian Academy of Restorative Dentistry and Prosthodontics, in Montreal, Quebec. Save the date

October 18-22 – ADA 2018 America’s Dental Meeting, in Honolulu, Hawaii. Save the date

November 9 – Toronto Academy of Dentistry – 81st Annual Winter Clinic, in Toronto, Ontario. Read more

November 25-28 – Greater NY Dental Meeting 2018, in New York, NY. Read more

January 31, February 2, 2019 – Yankee Dental Congress in Boston, Massachusetts. Read more

January 25-26, 2019 – Manitoba Dental Association Annual Meeting & Convention, in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Read more

March 7-9, 2019 – Pacific Dental Conference, in Vancouver, British Columbia. Read more

May 1-4, 2019: 38th AustralianDental Congress in Adelaide, Australia. Read more

 

Please let us know about upcoming continuing education meetings that could be of interest to Canadian dentists by emailing us at oasisdiscussions@cda-adc.ca

Dental industry news

CE Mark and Health Canada Regulatory Approvals for Datum Dental’s OSSIX Bone. prnewswire.com: Datum Dental, Ltd, leading provider of OSSIX® brand innovative solutions for bone and tissue regeneration for dentistry, proudly announces major regulatory clearances for OSSIX™ Bone with CE Mark in Europe and Health Canada approval. Read more

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We invite you to send us leads to news stories worth sharing (oasisdiscussions@cda-adc.ca) or 1-855-716-2747.

One comment

  1. Ontario’s attempt to address standards of care in TMD management, while it has some good pieces (e.g. coming right out and dictating that surgical intervention should not necessarily be regarded as a good alternative if conservative measures fail) falls flat on its face from the outset.

    TMD and occlusal disease are largely the result of problems with the occlusion. Ask anyone who actually treats these problems on a daily basis through occlusal therapy. Saying it is “not supported by the literature” illustrates a flaw with the design of the scientific studies (and worse yet, retrospective efforts such as with the Cochrane Collaboration) and not with the therapy. This is not a good foundation on which to build Standards of Care.

    Part of the issue is the training and experience of dentists. It is a reality that the further east you go from The Gold Coast (CA, OR, BC), the weaker the education is on occlusion. I was raised on gnathology in the 70s and was flabbergasted when during my post-grad experience in ON when the famous head of prosthodontics stated, “Well, we really don’t know much about occlusion so you just do your best.” That was not my education, nor should it be. You people in ON should be talking with Kois and Spears and OBI and even Pankey people before you put this to paper. They will have a lot of insight to guide you in a better direction. Depending on “The Literature” is a huge mistake in this area.

    Now, there are some “occlusal correction” modalities that are misguided. Anterior positioning of the mandible and then reconstructing the bite to this position is an example. This is a very antiquated approach but apparently is still followed by a small group of practitioners. The neuromuscular approach from what I’ve seen in a number of cases can result in this kind of positioning.

    In the end, I don’t think it’s wise to get too definitive about conservative measures because it’s too, knowledge, experience and technique specific. There ARE people who are very good at it. I think if you want a policy, it should look something like this:

    1. First stage intervention should consist of removable appliance therapy, possibly with support of physiotherapist. Orthodontics, restorative and other more permanent measures should not be considered as a first course of action.
    2. If appliance therapy has proven effective, then permanent occlusal correction can be considered.
    3. If appliance therapy has not been effective, permanent occlusal correction in case of severe occlusal discrepancies can still be considered, but with the express representation to the patient that resolution of the symptoms is NOT an expected result.
    4. Surgical intervention should always be considered the last resort and it should be stated to the patient that the outcome is uncertain. Indeed, they may be worse after the surgery and must be prepared for that eventuality.
    5. Resorption of condyles in and of itself is not an indication for surgery, including joint replacement. Patients can and do end up with comfortable, functional occlusions despite severe degenerative joint changes once the disease has taken its course and the malocclusion properly corrected.

    At the end of the day, we want patients to get better and not have to spend a lot of money for ineffective non-reversible dental care. Standards of Care if structured properly could do that. But I feel that the existing literature is too weak, too poorly designed, and too contradictory to be relied on too specifically. I think we’re still decades of good, well-designed science away from being able to do this properly. But in the meantime don’t handcuff the people that DO actually know how to help these people.

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