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Oasis Critical Moments: How would you manage this endodontic accident?

Oasis Critical Moments is a series of posts that provide Canadian dentists with the opportunity to hear about every-day clinical incidents and learn about how to manage these events effectively. The series showcases different scenarios that are presented by dental professionals who experienced these critical moments and how they managed them. 

We would like to hear from you. If you can identify with any of these situations or would like to share your own experience, reach out to us through our email at oasisdiscussions@cda-adc.ca or call us at 1 855-716-2747. 

Chiraz Guessaier, CDA Oasis Manager

Highlights

Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) extrusion beyond the apex, also known as ‘‘a hypochlorite accident,’’ is a well-known complication that seldom occurs during root canal therapy. These ‘‘accidents’’ have been the subject of several case reports published over the years. Until now, no publication has addressed the global synthesis of the general and clinical data related to NaOCl extrusion.

A systematic review of previously published case reports to identify, synthesize, and present a critical analysis of the available data is available and contains a standardized presentation of reporting data concerning NaOCl extrusions to refine and develop guidelines that should be used in further case report series.

Read the systematic review: Sodium Hypochlorite Accident: A Systematic Review (PDF) 

Full Conversation (19.33″)

 

 

 

Errata

  • When talking about pain control during the accident, Dr. Roda was describing the concerns not to inject anesthetic too close to the accident site. The accurate statement should be: one needs to avoid the area where the accident has created a “bolus of hypochlorite” rather than a “bolus of anesthetic.”
  • Referring to post-op antibiotic use, the accurate date of the article mentioned in the Annals of Internal Medicine is 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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