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Research

‘Usual treatment’ vs. ‘psychosocial interventions’ in the treatment of TMD: What’s the difference? A systematic review

This summary is based on the article published in the Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache: A systematic review and meta-analysis of usual treatment versus psychosocial interventions in the treatment of myofacial temporomandibular disorder pain (summer 2014) Carolina Roldán-Barraza, DDS/Steffani Janko, DDS, PhD/Julio Villanueva, DDS, MBA/Ignacio Araya, DDS, MSc/Hans-Christoph Lauer, DDS, PhD     Context Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) represent a complex set of conditions reflecting different symptoms that affect the Temporomandibular joint and surrounding structures. Epidemiologic studies have shown that the majority of TMD patients are diagnosed with myofacial pain. (1) The different approaches to treatment as well as ...

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What’s the most effective way to surgically remove mandibular wisdom teeth?

This is a summary of the Cochrane Systematic Review: Surgical techniques for the removal of mandibular wisdom teeth (Review, 2014) Coulthard P, Bailey E, Esposito M, Furness S, Renton TF, Worthington HV Full-text of the Systematic Review (PDF) Summary of the Systematic Review  Context This research assesses the benefits and harms of the different ways to surgically remove wisdom teeth from the lower jaw. Removing wisdom teeth is one of the most common operations in dental surgery. Various techniques have been developed to carry this out, but which is the most effective? The review considered the following risks from surgery: pain ...

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Audio interview: What are the outcomes of implants and restorations placed in general dental practices?

Chiraz Guessaier, Manager of the CDA Oasis Project, spoke with Dr. Ronald Craig about the research featured in the latest issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association: Outcomes of implants and restorations placed in general dental practices. A retrospective study by the Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning (PEARL) Network Drs. John D. Da Silva; Julie Kazimiroff; Athena Papas; Frederick A. Curro; Van P. Thompson; Donald A. Vena; Hongyu Wu; Damon Collie; Ronald G. Craig; for the Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning (PEARL) Network Group   Courtesy of the American Dental Association, you can access the full-text article for the next 3 months here (PDF) Audio interview ...

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What are the incidence rates, annual and 24-months, of defects and replacement on restorations?

This summary is based on the study conducted by the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network on 24-month evaluation of amalgam and composite based restorations.       Watch the Video   Factors affecting early failure rates of dental restorations Factors related to the patient factors: age, size of the lesion and location and type of tooth. Material failure: longevity of amalgam compared to resin-based restorations vary depending on patient and tooth characteristics. Factors related to the Clinician: age, gender, educational background. Goal of the Study Quantify the annual and two-year incidence rates of defects and replacement on restorations. Results of ...

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Video Presentation: What is the effect of root canal therapy on peri-operative pain?

This summary is based on the study conducted by the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network on peri-operative pain and root canal therapy. Donald Nixdorf, DDS, MS and Deborah Knaup, DDS, MS     Watch the Video   Severe pain most often occurs within the first 2 days following root canal therapy (RCT). Clinical Questions  What portion of patients experience severe pain following RCT? How does RCT affect the patients’ pain? Conclusion  On average, RCT reduces tooth pain intensity, duration, and interference in daily life.   Do you have any particular question on this topic? Do you have any comments or ...

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How effective is preemptive analgesia on postoperative pain following third molar surgery? Review of literatures

This summary is based on the article published in the Japanese Dental Science Review: Effectiveness of preemptive analgesia on postoperative pain following third molar surgery? Review of literatures (November 2013) Akira Yamaguchi and Kimito Sano  Context  Surgery to remove the mandibular third molar is relatively invasive and is often associated with postoperative pain, swelling and trismus, which are frustrating for both patients and surgeons. In particular, postoperative pain increases the patient’s suffering and anxiety, and can disrupt the homeostasis of the circulatory and endocrine systems (1—3). Since it is also reported that postoperative pain can have a negative influence on wound healing, reliable and fast-onset analgesia is ...

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When is it a good time to manage facial fractures? A systematic review

This summary is based on the article published in the International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: The effect of treatment timing on the management of facial fractures: a systematic review (August 2014) M. J. L. Hurrell, M. D. Batstone   Context Facial fractures are a common presentation to hospitals worldwide. Their treatment has evolved dramatically in recent decades, particularly since the introduction of open reduction and internal fixation. However, many uncertainties remain. The relevance of delay from injury to treatment is commonly disputed amongst surgeons and in the literature. Intuitively, delaying the treatment of facial fractures could increase the risk of infection, the likelihood of technical difficulties, and the discomfort experienced ...

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How successful are implants for orthodontic anchorage and what are the reasons of their failures?

This summary is based on the article published in Implant Dentistry: Implants for Orthodontic Anchorage: Success Rates and Reasons of Failures (April 2014) Juan C. Rodriguez, DDS, Fernando Suarez, DDS, Hsun-Liang Chan, DDS, MS, Miguel Padial-Molina, DDS, PhD, and Hom-Lay Wang, DDS, MSD, PhD Context In orthodontics, controlled forces are applied in specific directions to move teeth from improper locations into what is considered an “ideal” physiologic/esthetic location. To provide the movement, a steady and strong support known as orthodontic anchor is required. Anchorage, by definition, is a resistance to displacement provided by a static object. The most common anchor used is the patient’s own dentition; however, in some cases, the anchorage is limited or ...

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