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Medicine

Would you like to know more about managing patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome?

The Canadian Sleep Society is going to hold its bi-annual scientific meeting in Halifax October 4-6, 2013. One focus of this meeting will be on the role of dentistry in managing patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The following presentations should be of interest to those clinicians in the dental profession who would like to be involved in the care of sleep apnea patients. Pathophysiology of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome How to Diagnose Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome The Role of the Physician and Dentist in Identifying Patients Who Should be Screened for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treatment Options for the Sleep ...

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Brief: How would you manage a medical emergency in your dental office?

This Summary is an adaptation of the Clinical Info on Medical Emergencies provided by the Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPhA)  Treatment of a medical emergency in a dental office begins with assessment and, if necessary, treatment of airway, breathing and circulation (cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Most often, only after these basics are addressed should drugs be considered. They should, however, be readily available for such emergencies. A sugar source, such as orange juice or non-diet soft drink should be readily available for use in the management of hypoglycemic reactions. Additional agents may be appropriate depending on the nature of the dental practice.   ...

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Does Your Patient Need Penicillin?

This Post is adapted from the Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPhA) Drug Monograph: Penicillin G/Penicillin V Product Summary Table Pharmacology Penicillins G and V, known as the natural penicillins, are bactericidal against susceptible organisms. Penicillins interfere with the synthesis of cell wall mucopeptides, resulting in the formation of defective cell walls that will lyse and eventually result in death of the organism. The spectra of activity of penicillins G and V are similar: Penicillin G is more active against gram-negative organisms (e.g., Neisseria) and some anaerobes than is penicillin V. Penicillin G can be given parenterally, enabling the attainment of high serum ...

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What are NSAIDs?

This Post is adapted from the Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPhA) Drug Monograph: Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) Click here to view the Product Summary Table (web image) Click here to download the Product Summary Table (PDF) Indications and Clinical Use As anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic agents, NSAIDs provide symptomatic relief but do not cure the underlying disease. No NSAID has been proven superior for symptom relief. The choice of drug depends on individual risk factors, such as NSAID toxicity, individual patient response, compliance potential, dosage forms, cost and available evidence. For compliance, drugs with a long half-life or available in dosage ...

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Brief: When should you use anti-infective drugs?

This Summary is an adaptation of the Clinical Info on Medical Emergencies provided by the Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPhA) Consider the following when prescribing antibiotics: Use only when there is an indication. Use only when the risk-benefit ratio is favourable. They are not a substitute for establishing adequate drainage. Choose an effective agent with the narrowest spectrum of activity. Prescribe a therapeutic dose and consider a loading dose. Prescribe at an appropriate frequency and for an appropriate duration. Choose the drug with the fewest side effects. Consider laboratory culture and sensitivity tests to target specific bacteria with antibiotics identified as ...

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What is the clinical effectiveness and safety of buspirone versus benzodiazepines, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors for the treatment of anxiety?

This summary is based on the Rapid Response Report developed by the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health: Use of Buspirone for the treatment of anxiety: A review of the clinical effectiveness, safety, and cost effectiveness Full Report (PDF) Context   Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is a chronic anxiety disorder characterized by excessive, pervasive and uncontrollable worry. In the general population, GAD has a lifetime prevalence of 6%. Diagnosed twice as often in women than men, GAD typically presents as somatic illness, pain, fatigue, depression and/or sleep disturbances. Pharmacological treatments for GAD include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), tricyclic antidepressants, anticonvulsants, benzodiazepines ...

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How do you manage a patient who’s had a stroke?

This Medical Condition is presented by the JCDA Oasis Team and is available on Oasis Help Definition Stroke (cerebrovascular accident) is a serious and often fatal neurologic event characterized by the rapid appearance (usually over minutes) of a focal deficit of brain function. Pathophysiology: Of patients presenting with a stroke, 85% will have sustained a cerebral infarction due to inadequate blood flow to part of the brain, and the remainder will have had an intracerebral hemorrhage. If a stroke is not fatal, the survivor is often debilitated in motor function and/or speech. Warning signs: Four events are associated with a stroke: ...

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Is Your Patient Taking Calcium Channel Blockers?

This Post is adapted from the Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPhA) Drug Monograph: Calcium Channel Blockers Indications Angina Arrhythmias Hypertension Migraine prophylaxis: Verapamil Muscle cramps: Diltiazem  Product Summary Pharmacology This monograph focuses on the calcium channel blockers (CCBs) affecting the cardiovascular system. CCBs (also referred to as slow channel blockers, calcium entry blockers or calcium antagonists) are a chemically and pharmacologically heterogeneous group of drugs, but physiologically they all share the ability to selectively antagonize the calcium ion movements that are responsible for the excitation-contraction coupling in the cardiovascular system. There are two main classes of CCBs: Dihydropyridines (amlodipine, felodipine, nifedipine and ...

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