Home » Supporting Your Practice » Dental Specialties » Restorative Dentistry (page 4)

Restorative Dentistry

What are the emerging ceramic-based materials for Dentistry?

This summary is based on the article published in the Journal of Dental Research: Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry (December 2014) I. Denry and J.R. Kelly Context Three new ceramic-based materials have recently been introduced in dentistry: monolithic zirconia, zirconia-containing lithium silicate ceramics, and interpenetrating phase composites. These emerging restorative materials stem from very different technological approaches that are likely to lead to further developments. Purpose of the Review To give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis ...

Read More »

Rhinosinusitis in oral medicine and dentistry

This summary is based on the article published in the Australian Dental Journal: Rhinosinusitis in oral medicine and dentistry (September 2014) M Ferguson     Context Rhinosinusitis is a very common condition which is normally readily recognizable. Given the intimate anatomic relationship between the antrum and the posterior maxillary teeth, maxillary sinusitis can present as odontalgia. Distinguishing between odontogenic orofacial pain and pain associated with maxillary sinusitis is important to prevent unnecessary dental intervention and to direct patients to medical colleagues. Conversely, odontogenic infection can spread to involve the antrum, termed odontogenic sinusitis, or maxillary sinusitis of dental origin. Odontogenic ...

Read More »

What are the possible associations between socioeconomic position and caries?

This summary is based on the article published in the Journal of Dental Research: Socioeconomic Inequality and Caries: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (January 2015) F. Schwendicke, C.E. Dörfer, P. Schlattmann, L. Foster Page,W.M. Thomson, and S. Paris     Context Dental caries is the most prevalent disease worldwide, with the majority of caries lesions being concentrated in few, often disadvantaged social groups. A growing number of studies have found the distribution of caries lesions to be increasingly skewed, with a small fraction of (usually) disadvantaged individuals experiencing the majority of lesions or restorations. It has therefore been hypothesized that ...

Read More »

Are there morphological and structural changes in the enamel as a consequence of dental bleaching?

This summary is based on the article published in Materials Letters: New approach to determine the morphological and structural changes in the enamel as consequence of dental bleaching (February 2015) I. Izquierdo-Barba, C. Torres-Rodríguez, E. Matesanz, M. Vallet-Regí         Context Dental bleaching is commonly carried out to correct discolouration of anterior teeth. Most bleaching agents are strong oxidizing agents and the most popular bleaching agent includes hydrogen peroxide (1). Although this bleaching agent is highly effective in lightening tooth colour, concerns have been expressed regarding to associated post-bleaching complications including alteration in the surface morphology of enamel ...

Read More »

Powered/electric toothbrushes vs. manual toothbrushes: which is better for maintaining oral health? A systematic review

This summary is based on the Cochrane Systematic Review: Powered/electric toothbrushes compared to manual toothbrushes for maintaining oral health (June 2014) Yaacob M, Worthington HV, Deacon SA, Deery C, Walmsley AD, Robinson PG, Glenny AM Context Good oral hygiene, through the removal of plaque (a sticky film containing bacteria) by effective tooth brushing has an important role in the prevention of gum disease and tooth decay. Dental plaque is the primary cause of gingivitis (gum inflammation) and is implicated in the progression to periodontitis, a more serious form of gum disease that affects the tissues that support the teeth. The ...

Read More »

Is octenidine hydrochloride available and/or recommended as an oral rinse agent?

This question was submtted by general dentist: Since Octenidine Hydrochloride seems better than Chlorhexidine, is it available and/or recommended as an oral rinse agent?  Under what name can it be purchased? Drs. Archie McNicol and Suham Alexander provided this quick initial response.   Antiseptic mouth rinses are used clinically to improve dental health and/or to prevent infections arising from oral pathogens. Antimicrobial mouth rinses target predominantly Streptococcus mutans.  Octenidine hydrochloride (Octenisept) belongs to a class of chemicals called bispyridinamines and was initially developed for use as a topical antimicrobial agent. It is capable of forming complexes and adhering to whole cells ...

Read More »

Is there a benefit for the routine use of an antibacterial mouth rinse prior to dental appointments?

This question was submitted by a general dentist: Is there any evidence of benefit for the routine use of an antibacterial mouth rinse (ie. chlorhexidine gluconate 0.12%) prior to dental appointments?  Would there be any contraindications to this practice? Drs. Gordon Schwartz from Gumdocs and Suham Alexander provided this quick initial response.      The intended aim of having patients use a pre-procedural antibacterial mouth rinse is to reduce or limit the exposure of patients and dental staff to microorganisms that are found in aerosols in the dental office as well as to decrease contamination of equipment and operatory surfaces ...

Read More »

What are the possible ways of reducing dental erosive potential of acidic beverages

This summary is based on the article published in the Australian Dental Journal: Possible ways of reducing dental erosive potential of acidic beverages (September 2014) T Stefański, L Postek-Stefańska Context Frequent consumption of acidic beverages is related to excessive tooth wear, namely dental erosion. Preventive measures may involve reduction or elimination of acidic drink consumption. However, the success of this approach is difficult to achieve as it is highly dependent on patient compliance. Therefore, a practical way of minimizing the erosive potential of popular acidic drinks may be their chemical modification. Purpose of the Review The aim of this article ...

Read More »