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Restorative Dentistry

Distinct Oral Neutrophil Subsets Define Health and Periodontal Disease States

Dr. Michael Glogauer, from the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Toronto, recently published an article in the Journal of Dental Research titled: Distinct Oral Neutrophil Subsets Define Health and Periodontal Disease States. In this interview Dr. Glaogauer gives further details about this research and its significance for dentistry.  Highlights Neutrophils exit the vasculature and swarm to sites of inflammation and infection. However, these cells are abundant in the healthy, inflammation-free human oral environment, suggesting a unique immune surveillance role within the periodontium. We hypothesize that neutrophils in the healthy oral cavity occur in an intermediary parainflammatory state that allows them to interact ...

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Managing Carious Lesions: Consensus Recommendations on Carious Tissue Removal

This is a summary of the article published in Advances in Dental Research (May 2016) titled “Managing Carious Lesions: Consensus Recommendations on Carious Tissue Removal.” F. Schwendicke , J.E. Frencken , L. Bjørndal , M. Maltz , D.J. Manton , D. Ricketts , K. Van Landuyt , A. Banerjee , G. Campus , S. Doméjean, M. Fontana, S. Leal12, E. Lo, V. Machiulskiene, A. Schulte, C. Splieth, A.F. Zandona, and N.P.T. Innes Read the full text (PDF) Highlights The International Caries Consensus Collaboration undertook a consensus process and here presents clinical recommendations for carious tissue removal and managing cavitated carious ...

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What Are the Uses, Advantages, and Disadvantages of Composite Resins?

Composite resins are  excellent esthetic restorative materials. Composite materials are available in various shades to match the esthetic requirements of individual restorations. Even though, composite restorations are highly technique sensitive, they demonstrate good clinical longevity if placed with care. The various uses of composites include: Esthetic tooth-colored restoration in the anterior region Diastema closure Improving/modifying tooth size and shape Masking discolored teeth via composite veneering For luting and core build-up Orthodontic bracket adhesive Advantages The advantages of composite restorations are: Excellent esthetics Conservation of tooth structure Good longevity Can be repaired Bonds to tooth structure Complex tooth preparation needed Economic ...

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What should one consider when preparing a tooth for an all-ceramic restoration? How do I cement an all-ceramic restoration?

Preparation for all ceramic restoration requires sufficient tooth reduction to provide adequate space for porcelain, a definite finish line and smooth and rounded line angles to reduce stress concentration within the ceramic material. Adequate tooth reduction can be achieved by utilizing a silicone putty reduction guide, depth grooves, known dimension burs and measurements of temporary restorations. All-ceramic restoration margins can be placed either supragingival or equigingival as they areexcellent tooth-colored esthetic materials. Tooth preparation guidelines Axial reduction of 0.8-1mm. Occlusal reduction 2mm. Incisal reduction 1.5-2mm. Chamfered or rounded shoulder finish line. Maximum taper of 6 degree. No undercuts. No box ...

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CDA Oasis Conversations: Finding the Missing Link: Periodontal Disease and Cardiovascular Disease

Drs. Liran Levin and Maria Febbraio spoke with Dr. John O’Keefe about the latest research done at the University of Alberta’s School of Dentistry about the missing link between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. Watch the interview Dr. Liran Levin Dr. Levin is the Head of the Periodontology Division at the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Canada. He is also a visiting professor at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA. Dr. Levin was the Head of Research at the School of Dentistry, Rambam Health Care Campus, and Faculty of Medicine – Technion IIT Haifa, Israel. Dr. ...

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What are some common mistakes that dentists make when performing surgical extractions?

Surgical extractions involve the removal of a tooth after elevation of a soft tissue flap, removal of bone with or without sectioning of the tooth. At times, surgical extractions may be less traumatic and more conservative than non-surgical extractions. However, there also instances when surgical extractions may not proceed as planned. Some common mistakes that are made during these procedures are listed below. Even after evaluation of the tooth and the determination that a surgical extraction is indicated, dentists may still try to use forceps to remove the tooth. This can result in coronal fractures which may be helpful in ...

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What strategies may be implemented for bleach-induced tooth sensitivity?

A patient reports tooth sensitivity during the initial phase of tooth-whitening procedures, what strategies may be implemented? Pulpal penetration of peroxide, dehydration, and tray-related tooth movements have been implicated in bleach-induced tooth sensitivity. This sensitivity is transient and generally dissipates within a short time. Strategies Decreasing the contact intervals may be a start, using 1-hour instead of 2-hour contact times or even every other day. Decreasing the concentration of the product chosen, 10% or less carbamide peroxide rather than higher levels, is a second choice. It has been reported that not pre-brushing the teeth decreases sensitivity without undue impairment in ...

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Reviewing and comparing strategies for treating pit-and-fissure lesions in permanent teeth

This summary is based on the article published in Dental Research Journal: Treating Pit-and-Fissure Caries: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis (April 2015) Schwendicke, A.M. Jäger, S. Paris, L.Y. Hsu, and Y.K. Tu Context For shallow or moderately deep pit-and-fissure lesions, various treatment options are available: Noninvasive treatments (e.g., fluoride application, antibacterial treatments, oral hygiene advice) avoid any dental hard tissue removal; Micro-invasive treatments (e.g., sealing) remove only a few micrometers of hard tissues by etching; and Minimally invasive methods (e.g., “preventive” resin/sealant restoration) remove carious dentin but avoid sacrificing sound tissues. Purpose of the article Systematically review and compare ...

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