Home » Supporting Your Practice » Dental Specialties (page 10)

Dental Specialties

What are non-nutritional sucking habits and what are the best interventions?

Non-nutritional sucking habits are learned patterns of muscular contraction. The most common types are: Finger habit Lip wetting or sucking Abnormal swallowing or tongue thrusting Abnormal muscular habits Sucking is the best-developed sensation avenue for an infant. Deprivation may cause an infant to suck on the thumb or finger for additional gratification. If a child stops non-nutritional sucking habits within his or her first 3 years of life, the damage usually is limited to the maxillary anterior segment and presents as an open bite. If the habit continues past 3 years, the damage may be long-lasting and detrimental to the developing dentoalveolar structures. After 4 ...

Read More »

Are there side effects of intravenous midazolam sedation when used in paediatric dentistry? A review

This summary is based on the article published in International Journal of Pediatric Dentistry: Reported side effects of intravenous midazolam sedation when used in pediatric dentistry: a review (May 2015) Arathi Papineni Mcintosh, Paul Francis Ashley and Liege Lourenco-Matharu   Context Intravenous (IV) midazolam may be of value as an alternative pediatric dental sedation technique, but there is some apprehension concerning its routine use due to a lack of evidence regarding its safety and side effects. Purpose of the Review To review all available literature reporting the side effects of IV midazolam in children undergoing dental procedures. Key Findings There ...

Read More »

Is weight gain associated with the incidence of periodontitis? A systematic review and meta-analysis

This summary is based on the article published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology: Is weight gain associated with the incidence of periodontitis? A systematic review and meta-analysis (June 2015) Gustavo G. Nascimento, Fabio R.M. Leite, Loc G. Do, Karen G. Peres, Marcos B. Correa, Flavio F. Demarco and Marco A. Peres   Context When an unbalance between calorific intake and energy expenditure occurs, the body may excessively accumulate fat leading to overweight and further to obesity (Martinez et al. 2014). Several reports have demonstrated the adverse effects of obesity on chronic health outcomes, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, infectious ...

Read More »

How does tooth retention through endodontic microsurgery compare to tooth replacement using an implant supported single crown

This summary is based on the article published in the Journal of Endodontics: Tooth Retention through Endodontic Microsurgery or Tooth Replacement Using Single Implants: A Systematic Review of Treatment Outcomes (January 2015) Mahmoud Torabinejad, DDS, MSD, PhD, Maria Landaez, DDS, Marites Milan, DDS, MS, Chun Xiao Sun, DDS, MS, Jeffrey Henkin, DDS, MS, Aladdin Al-Ardah, DDS, MS, Mathew Kattadiyil, DDS, MDS, MSD, Khaled Bahjri, MD, DrPH, MPH, Salem Dehom, MPH, Elisa Cortez, MILS,¶ and Shane N. White, BDentSc, MS, MA, PhD Context Clinicians are regularly confronted with difficult choices. Should a tooth that has not healed through nonsurgical root canal ...

Read More »

Comparing the survival rate of intentionally replanted teeth and implant-supported single crowns. A systematic review

This summary is based on the article published in the Journal of Endodontics: Survival of Intentionally Replanted Teeth and Implant-supported Single Crowns: A Systematic Review (July 2015) Mahmoud Torabinejad, DMD, MSD, PhD, Nathan A. Dinsbach, DDS, MSD, Michael Turman, DDS, MSD, Robert Handysides, DDS, Khaled Bahjri, MD, MPH, and Shane N. White, BDentSc, MS, MA, PhD Context Nonsurgical root canal treatment (NSRCT) provides high long-term survival and success rates (1–4), allowing millions of people to preserve their natural dentitions. Although nonsurgical initial root canal treatment and retreatment have high success rates, periapical disease can remain (5–7). Additionally, successfully treated teeth ...

Read More »

Bioceramic materials in endodontics

This summary is based on the article published in Endodontic Topics: Bioceramic materials in endodontics (May 2015) Zhejun Wang Courtesy of Wiley Publishing, you can access the full-text article for the next 3 months (PDF)   Context During the past two decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bioactive ceramics used for endodontic treatment. Bioceramic materials, with their biocompatible nature and excellent physico-chemical properties, are widely used in endodontic applications. They can function as cements, root repair materials, root canal sealers and filling materials, which have the advantages of enhanced biocompatibility, potential increased root ...

Read More »

What are the benefits of laser therapy?

This response summary is based on “Laser-Assisted Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy” in Principles and Practice of Laser Dentistry (2nd Edition), Elsevier, 2016 Mary Lynn Smith & Angie Mott In any periodontal therapy, it is essential that contaminants be thoroughly removed from the tooth structure. Lasers have a direct damaging effect on bacteria, supporting the body’s healing response. Incorporating lasers into conventional therapies helps accomplish treatment objectives. Instrumentation in conventional non-surgical periodontal therapy focuses on the tooth structure and debridement most often is accomplished by means of manual and power scaling. In the future, lasers also will be used for root debridement. Although ...

Read More »

What are the basic types of bone-grafting materials used for the treatment of periodontal defects and what is osseous coagulum?

Grafts include autografts (intraoral, extraoral), allografts, alloplasts, and xenografts. The autografts may be harvested from the patient’s hip and rib (extraoral) or from a healing extraction socket, chin, maxillary tuberosity, or retromolar areas (intraoral). Allografts consist of freeze-dried bone and freeze-dried decalcified bone from another source (usually cadaver bone). Alloplasts are synthetic materials; the most commonly used are tricalcium phosphate, calcium carbonate, and hydroxyapatite. Xenografts are typically bovine-based. Osseous coagulum is another type of grafting material, normally obtained during osseous surgery. The bone or blood shavings are collected and then packed into the defect in an attempt to promote new bone formation. Because the bone is predominantly cortical, ...

Read More »