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Dental Specialties

Exploring Xerostomia in the Elderly with Dr. Aviv Ouanounou

Dr. Aviv Ouanounou explores with Dr. Suham Alexander the topic of xerostomia in the elderly patient.  Video Highlights Xerostomia or dry mouth is a common condition that occurs in the elderly population. In xerostomia, salivary flow is reduced. Because saliva has several important functions in the oral cavity including but not limited to antimicrobial effects, digestion, swallowing and speech, decreased salivary flow has many important implications. Prevalence in the elderly ranges from 45-50% compared to 10-14% in the general population 3 main causes in the elderly Use of non- and prescription medications Medical conditions such as salivary gland disorders (Sjogren’s syndrome), ...

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How does orthodontic tooth movement impact endodontic treatment and the outcome?

Teeth undergoing orthodontic tooth movement may require endodontic treatment which could be related or unrelated to orthodontic treatment. However, it is always preferable to try to foresee and treat the tooth endodontically prior to beginning orthodontics for some of the following reasons: Pulpal or periradicular pain can be masked by discomfort associated with that of tooth movement. Once fixed appliances are placed on teeth, rubber dam isolation can be difficult. Creating endodontic access preparations can be confusing as the long axis of the tooth may be difficult to determine. Working lengths or finding apical stops may be compromised by root ...

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What are the general principles to consider when performing surgical extractions?

Preoperative Assessment Prior to extraction, dentists must review the patient’s medical and social history and take stock of any medications he/she may be taking. The preoperative evaluation will include both a clinical as well as radiographic examination to assess any challenges that may be encountered during the procedure. Clinical Examination The clinical examination should include an evaluation of how accessible the tooth is in the dental arch. Assess whether the patient has a restricted opening, the tooth’s positioning in the arch, as well as crowding which may interfere with access and extraction of the tooth. Large carious lesions or large ...

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What are some common mistakes that dentists make when performing surgical extractions?

Surgical extractions involve the removal of a tooth after elevation of a soft tissue flap, removal of bone with or without sectioning of the tooth. At times, surgical extractions may be less traumatic and more conservative than non-surgical extractions. However, there also instances when surgical extractions may not proceed as planned. Some common mistakes that are made during these procedures are listed below. Even after evaluation of the tooth and the determination that a surgical extraction is indicated, dentists may still try to use forceps to remove the tooth. This can result in coronal fractures which may be helpful in ...

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What are the Applications and Limitations of Conventional Radiographic Techniques?

This resource is provided courtesy of Wiley Publishing. Read and download the resource in PDF   Watch the video presentation Source: Clinical maxillary sinus elevation surgery, Wiley Blackwell, 2014

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What is the best antibiotic for orofacial infections of an endodontic nature?

Infections of an endodontic nature that are associated with orofacial pain are typically caused by obligate anaerobic bacteria. Given the spectrum of action, penicillins are the preferred antibiotic of choice. Drugs in this class act against the obligate anaerobes but, also affects the substrate interrelationships amongst various bacterial strains within the infection. As some of the strains of bacteria start to die, the others are unable to survive. The penicillins include amoxicillin as well as Augmentin (an amoxicillin and clavulanate combination). When penicillin is not effective, clindamycin may be used as it acts against anaerobic bacteria. However, clinician’s should use ...

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What kind of materials can be used to obturate root canals?

While other materials are available for obturating root canals, gutta percha is still the most widely used and accepted material. Gutta perch is biocompatible, inert material which does not irritate tissues. Composed of zinc oxide, barium sulfate and transpolyisoprene, gutta percha has the ability to adapt to root canal walls. Resilon, a thermoplastic polymer which contains bioactive glass, has become increasingly popular as a filling material recently. This technique involves the creation of a chemical bond between the sealer and filling material. Other paraformaldehyde-containing pastes have been proposed but, due to antigenic and cytotoxic effects on tissue, these have not ...

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Do I have to treat a discoloured primary tooth?

When a primary tooth discolours and turns grayish, it is usually secondary to a traumatic episode. The discolouration indicates a necrotic pulp or that hemorrhaging has occurred and entered the dentinal tubules and can appear within a month of the original injury. The tooth may exhibit a light gray colour initially but may progressively darken. Occasionally, the tooth may present with a yellowish colour due to calcific degeneration of the pulpal tissues. Treatment of these teeth is not always indicated unless there is evidence of pathology. As such, appropriate examination and follow-up is necessary in these cases. Source: Dental Secrets, ...

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