Home » Supporting Your Practice » Dental Specialties » Oral Medicine (page 3)

Oral Medicine

What are the causes of a burning tongue?

This question was submitted by a general dentist: What are the causes of burning tongue?     Dr. Gary Klasser in collaboration with Dr. Suham Alexander, Oasis Clinical Editor, provided this quick initial response (Glossodynia, Glossopyrosis, Stomatodynia, Stomatopyrosis, Sore tongue, Oral dysaesthesia) Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is an idiopathic condition which predominantly affects peri- or post-menopausal women in a higher frequency than it affects men. The condition has not been reported in children. The burning sensation may occur in several sites of the oral cavity, such as the hard palate, gums and lower lip; however, it most often presents bilaterally ...

Read More »

How would you manage sleep bruxism in special needs patients?

This summary is based on the article published in Research in Developmental Disabilities: Treatment of bruxism in individuals with developmental disabilities: a systematic review (September 2009) Russell Lang, Pamela J. White, Wendy Machalicek, Mandy Rispoli, Soyeon Kang, Jeannie Aquilar, Mark O’Reilly, Jeff Sigafoos, Giulio Lancioni, Robert Didden Context  Individuals with developmental disabilities experience more oral and craniofacial diseases and injuries than the general population. (1)  Bruxism is a serious psycho-physiological disorder and a common clinical issue in dentistry. (2)  Although data are limited, bruxism appears to be more common in individuals with developmental disabilities, specifically, profound/severe mental retardation, autism spectrum disorders, and Down’s syndrome than other ...

Read More »

Orofacial syndromes: a better understanding of the etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and management

This summary is based on the article published by the International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology: Orofacial Syndromes: An Approach Towards Etiopathogenesis, Diagnosis and Management. A Systematic Review (January 2013) Context Currently, there are more than 4,000 genetic disorders identified to date, of which orofacial syndromes form a considerable part. Genetic factors either in isolation or in combination with various environmental factors play an important role in causing these craniofacial anomalies.  It becomes a challenge for the dental practitioner to diagnose and manage orofacial syndromes due to the complexity of their multi-system involvement.  Purpose of the Review The paper ...

Read More »

Are there any approaches to caries prevention and therapy for the elderly?

This summary is based on the article published in Advances in Dental Research: Approaches to Caries Prevention and Therapy in the Elderly (September 2013) Context The population of the world is aging. A greater proportion of older people are retaining increasing numbers of natural teeth. Aging is associated with changes in oral architecture and muscle weakness, making personal oral hygiene more difficult, particularly for the oldest and most frail individuals. Furthermore, there is exposure of root dentin with its higher pH for demineralization in addition to enamel as a substrate for caries. Aging is also associated, for many in the developed world, with taking multiple medications, with the associated ...

Read More »

How efficient are Toluidine Blue and Brush Biopsy in diagnosing oral lesions?

This summary is based on the article published in the International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology: Efficacy of Toluidine Blue and Brush Biopsy in Oral Lesions (January 2013) Context Oral cancer is a global health problem and its early detection is of prime importance. In vivo stains and brush biopsy have emerged in recent years to aid as clinical diagnostic tools.  Purpose of the Study The study assessed the efficacy and accuracy of Toluidine blue and brush biopsy in comparison to wedge biopsy in patients with oral pre-malignancies and malignant lesions.  Key Messages The combined evaluation of Toluidine blue ...

Read More »

What are the microbiological and immuno-pathological aspects of peri-implant diseases?

This summary is based on the article published in the Archives of Oral Biology: Microbiological and immuno-pathological aspects of peri-implant diseases (January 2014) Context Peri-implant diseases are a cluster of ‘‘contemporary’’ oral infections in humans that have emerged as a result of the routine application of osseointegrated dental implants in clinical practice. They are characterized by the inflammatory destruction of the implant-supporting tissues, as a result of biofilm formation on the implant surface. Peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis are analogous to gingivitis and periodontitis that affect natural teeth.  The Purpose of the Review Provide insights into the infectious aetiology and immuno-pathology of peri-implant diseases, and to identify similarities ...

Read More »

What’s new in the world of oral fungal infections?

This summary is based on the article published in the Dental Clinics of North America: Update on oral fungal infections (October 2013) Key Messages Candidiasis is the most common oral fungal infection diagnosed in humans. Candidiasis may result from immune system dysfunction or as a result of local or systemic medical treatment. Because oral Candida is generally a localized infection, topical treatment methods are the first line of therapy, especially for the pseudomembranous and erythematous variants. Patients with a dental prosthesis should also be advised to disinfect the prosthesis routinely during their Candida treatment period, as the prosthesis may serve as a source of fungal reinfection. ...

Read More »

What should you know about facial cutaneous sinuses of dental origin?

This summary is based on the article published in the British Dental Journal: Facial cutaneous sinuses of dental origin: a diagnostic challenge (December 2013) Key Message A dental aetiology must always be considered for any cutaneous sinus tract in the head or neck. Elimination of the dental source of infection results in resolution of the sinus tract without the need for surgical excision and long-term unacceptable aesthetic results. The article Depicts the clinical presentation of facial cutaneous sinus tracts. Explains how to correctly diagnose facial cutaneous sinuses. Describes the management of facial cutaneous sinuses. Context It is common for practitioners to misdiagnose the cause of facial cutaneous sinus tracts, ...

Read More »