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Dental Materials

Dental Amalgam Update

This summary is based on two critical appraisals published in the Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry: Dental Amalgam Update—Part I: Clinical Efficacy (October 2013) Dental Amalgam Update—Par t II: Biological Effects (December 2013) Context  Dental amalgam use has been controversial ever since the Crawcour brothers of France introduced amalgam to the United States in 1833. It has been criticized for its alleged clinical shortcomings and biologic effects. Dental Amalgam Update—Part I: Clinical Efficacy  Studies Reviewed Bonded amalgam sealants and adhesive resin sealants: five-year clinical results. Quintessence Int. 2004 May;35(5):351-7. Cross-sectional radiographic survey of amalgam and resin-based composite posterior restorations. Quintessence Int. 2007 ...

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What is the effect of several bleaching agents on teeth stained with a resin-based sealer?

This summary is based on the article published in the International Endodontic Journal: Effect of several bleaching agents on teeth stained with a resin-based sealer (January 2014) Context Remnants of root filling materials and sealers in root filled teeth have been shown to cause tooth discoloration. Various bleaching agents are available to reverse tooth discoloration, including hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate. Several investigations have assessed the discoloration potential of sealers and their effects on the teeth. However, there appears to be no documented research on efficacy of different bleaching agents for reversing discoloration caused by endodontic sealers. Purpose of the Study The study was designed to evaluate the effects of ...

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What is the best method to prepare enamel on teeth surface to improve the bonding of fixed orthodontic braces?

This summary is based on the Cochrane systematic review: Preparing tooth surfaces in preparation for the bonding of fixed orthodontic braces Context  Acid etching of tooth surfaces to promote the bonding of orthodontic attachments to the enamel has been a routine procedure in orthodontic treatment since the 1960s. Various types of orthodontic etchants and etching techniques have been introduced in the past five decades. Although a large amount of information on this topic has been published, there is a significant lack of consensus regarding the clinical effects of different dental etchants and etching techniques. Purpose of the Review To compare the ...

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Thinking about what makes the ideal dental restorative material?

This summary is based on the article published in Advances in Dental Research: What constitutes an ideal dental restorative material? (November 2013) Key Messages Intense environmental concerns recently have prompted dentistry to evaluate the performance and environmental impact of existing restoration materials. Doing so entices us to explore the ‘what if?’ innovation in materials science to create more ideal restorative materials. Articulating a specification for the design and evaluation methods is proving to be more complicated than originally anticipated. Challenges exist not only in specifying how the material should be manipulated and perform clinically, but also in understanding and incorporating implications of the skill of the operator placing the ...

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ADA Professional Product Review: Laboratory evaluation of 12 bulk-fill composites

This summary is based on the ADA Professional Product Review:  A Laboratory Evaluation of Bulk-Fill Versus Traditional  Multi-Increment-Fill Resin-Based Composites The Review can be accessed through the ADA website Access the full-text article (PDF) Context Unlike traditional composites, which typically are placed in maximum increments of 2 millimeters (mm), bulk-fill composites are designed to be placed in 4 mm, or sometimes greater, increments. Manufacturers claim that bulk-fill materials have greater depth of cure and lower polymerization induced shrinkage stress thanks to technology like “polymerization modulators,” which they say allow a certain amount of flexibility and optimized network structure during polymerization. Studies have demonstrated some comparable physical and mechanical properties among a handful of bulk-fill and traditional composites. ...

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Does warming composite prior to placing in preparation result in better depth curing?

This question was submitted by a general dentist: Does warming composite prior to placing in preparation result in better depth curing? Dr. Jacinta Santos, Assistant Professor of Restorative Dentistry, Schulich School of Dentistry at Western University, provided a quick initial response  Studies have demonstrated that pre-heating resin composite produces many benefits for the restoration process: Reduced pre-cured viscosity Enhanced adaptation Increased post-cured surface hardness Increased degree of polymerization Research shows that pre-heating composite in a heating device to a temperature of approximately 68°C (± 50 – 55 °C in the composite material) can provide advantages during the restoration process. However, once ...

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Why are flowable resin-based composites so popular?

This summary is based on the Journal of the American Dental Association Perspectives-Observations (December 2013) Advantages of Flowable Resins Flowable resins also vary markedly in viscosity. Some flow almost like water when placed in tooth preparations, and others are relatively putty-like. All brands of flowables are less viscous than are conventional composites. The major reason flowables are popular is one significant singular advantage they flow. Limitations of Flowable Resins The polymerization shrinkage and stress of some flowable composite brands have been shown to be more than those of conventional composites. Recently it has been shown that some new brands of flowables now exhibit wear characteristics similar to those of conventional composites. The strength of some flowables has been shown to ...

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What are the reasons for the failure of posterior dental restorations?

This summary is based on the article published in the European Journal of Oral Sciences: Longevity of posterior dental restorations and reasons for failure (December 2012) Context and Purpose of the Study Tooth-coloured restorative materials are being used increasingly more often in Class II preparations in permanent teeth. The authors used a practice-based study design to assess the survival time of Class II restorations and to identify factors relevant to their longevity. Key Messages In this practice-based study, amalgam restorations showed significantly better longevity than resin composite.  Secondary caries were the most common reason for replacing resin-composite restorations. Failure of the resin-composite restorations was significantly related ...

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