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Oral Radiology Supporting Your Practice

Systematic Interpretation of Common Dental Radiographs: Episode 5: Seeing vs. Observing Pantomographs

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Dr. Bob Wood, specialist in oral and maxillofacial radiology at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, joins Dr. John O’Keefe in the 5th episode of a series of video presentations that help clinicians to systematically review and interpret their radiographs. Using real clinical cases, Dr. Wood points out the required steps to get to an accurate interpretation that leads to a precise diagnosis. 

In this 5th episode, Dr. Wood speaks about the systematic approach to interpreting pantomographs and the difference between seeing and observing this type of radiographs. 

In this video, Dr. Wood shows six radiographs that he would like you to observe. He would also like you to share your written observations with him. You can do so by sending us an email to oasisdiscussions@cda-adc.ca and we will forward those to him for the next episode. You can request to remain anonymous and we will remove all identifiers. 

Until next time!

Chiraz Guessaier, CDA Oasis Manager

Read/download the transcript of the conversation (PDF)

Other Episodes in the Series

Oasis Moment (2.09″)

Full Conversation (32.10″)

 

7 Comments

  1. tabarek almosuli December 6, 2018

    Hello
    Thank you for the refresher course about PAN anatomy
    I was wondering, what are your recommendations for dental radiography exposure detection for the dental personnel? Are we required to monitor such exposure, esp with Pan machine as it is usually not in a concealed area.

    Reply
    1. Bob December 17, 2018

      Yeah – This is probabaly easier for me to answer for Ontario because we have to have annual inspections but panoramics – especially digital ones are supersafe for operators. Key points are to be far away (inverse square law says if you are 4 times further away then you get 1/16th the radiation. There is also a good article by John Reid in Triple O ages ago about drywall as a barrier to radiation. I don’t have it = wait here it is on pubmed:https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8515994
      and another one here
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6583631

  2. Dr. Paul Belzycki, DDS December 6, 2018

    Dear Bob.

    Many thanks for this series of posts.
    What I have noticed is the rush to ever more sophisticated technologies, with the hope that therein is to be found all the answers and solutions. Folks are forgetting to employ common sense and wisdom that is gained through effort and experience.

    We are of the same vintage… Old.
    But as an Older colleague once told me…Old Chickens make the best soup.

    We all appreciate and benefit from your efforts in these presentations.

    Dr. Paul Belzycki, DDS

    Reply
    1. Bob December 17, 2018

      I couldn’t agree more. Advanced imaging has its place and we do use it but at the end of the day it’s like any other thing in the toolbox – if you don’t know which end of the handpiece to pick up, you are doomed. Old chicken or not! Now, I am going to go sit in the hot tub with a bucket of cut vegetables and some egg noodles..

  3. REHAN MALIK December 13, 2018

    Many thanks for posting this, a really good presentation.

    Reply
    1. Bob December 17, 2018

      All kudos go to John O’Keefe and Chiraz Guessaier. The fact that I don’t look like the complete idiot that I am is positively a “Festivus Miracle.”

  4. Garry Lunn January 14, 2019

    Fantastic series, thank you so much. There is so little information out there on radiography, as you have presented. Can hardly wait to see the next series on the results of the finding on the pans.

    Reply

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