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Issues & People Supporting Your Practice

Cannabis: A Round-up with Implications for Dental Practice

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Dr. Jose Lança joined me for a round-up on the implications of legalizing cannabis in Canada. His presentation speaks to the broader implications of such substance and offers a wide range of considerations for Canadian dentists. Cannabis use and abuse will affect how dental treatment is dispensed and how dentists communicate with their patients about the potential risks of consuming recreational marijuana. 

Dr. Lança is an assistant professor in the Faculty of Dentistry and the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto. He is an expert with extensive research in the area of substance abuse. 

We welcome your thoughts, suggestions, and questions. please email us at oasisdiscussions@cda-adc.ca or call our toll-free number 1-855-716-2747.

Until next time!

Chiraz Guessaier, CDA Oasis Manager

Highlights

  • High-frequency use adverse effects are: increases in periodontal disease and dental caries, xerostomia, and stomatitis, among others.
  • Lower-frequency use adverse effects: Leukoplekia, inflammation and edema of the uvula, alveolar bone loss,among others.
  • The endogenous cannabinoid system has two main receptors: CB1 receptor, which is primarily found in the brain and central nervous system, and CB2 receptor which is primarily located in peripheral tissues.
  • Studies show that the increased frequency of cannabis consumption during adolescence leads to a decrease in cognitive functioning, a decrease in educational and personal accomplishment, an increase in the risk of dependence and harm to developing adolescent brains, an increase in the rates of psychosis and other neuro-psychiatric disorders, particularly bipolar and anxiety disorders, and an increase in the risk of other substance abuse, namely alcohol, tobacco and opioids. 
  • Tests have shown that up to 5 nanograms of THC concentration per milliliter of blood constitute minor or moderate motor impairment. Five nanograms or higher constitute an offense that will be prosecuted either by indictment in serious cases or by summary conviction in less serious cases.

Download/Read the transcript of the video presentation (PDF)

Oasis Moment (1.02″)

 

Full Presentation (23.44″)

Cannabis A Round-up with Implications for Dental Practice from Canadian Dental Association on Vimeo.

1 Comments

  1. Simi Silver June 30, 2018

    I’m disappointed that you chose to present only the unusual negative effects. There are far more benenfits and this medication is far less dangerous with much fewer side effects than most used to treat the conditions it treats

    Reply

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