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Periodontics Preventive Dentistry

Are probiotics effective in the prevention or treatment of periodontal disease?

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This summary is based on the article published in Clinical Oral Investigations: Effects of probiotics in periodontal diseases: a systematic review (September 2013)

Nicolás Yanine, Ignacio Araya, Romina Brignardello-Petersen, Alonso Carrasco-Labra, Almudena González, Arelis Preciado, Julio Villanueva, Mariano Sanz, and Conchita Martin

Context

Periodontal diseases are divided into two general stages affecting a majority of adults: gingivitis and periodontitis. (1) Both diseases require the presence of plaque bacteria which are thought to induce pathological changes in the tissues by direct and indirect means [2].

Although conventional treatments are considered effective, efforts to improve periodontal therapies through complementary treatments are at research. Recently, there has been increasing interest in probiotic control against periodontal diseases, and a number of clinical trials have been conducted to elucidate the possible impact on oral health.

Purpose of the Review

This review was designed to determine the effects of probiotics in prevention and/or treatment of periodontal diseases.

Key Messages

Based on the results of this review, the effectiveness of probiotics on the prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases is questionable. There is currently insufficient evidence demonstrating the benefits of systematic preventative use of probiotics in patients with periodontal diseases.

Clinical Relevance

The use of probiotics is described to prevent or treat periodontal diseases in some clinical trials; therefore, a systematic review of the evidence for the effect of periodontal diseases is needed.

References

  1. Armitage GC (1995) Clinical evaluation of periodontal diseases. Periodontol 7:39–53
  2. Page RC (1986) Gingivitis. J Clin Periodontol 13(5):345–359

 

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1 Comment

  1. Dr K M Black March 11, 2014

    I recommend oral probiotic gum for patients after I have used the diode laser for subgingival bacterial reduction. I do this because it seems logical (eliminate the bacterial population and then repopulate with benign bugs) and I have had very good clinical results. I would be delighted if someone actually did a proper clinical trial of this protocol!

    Reply

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